A place of empowerment and encouragment for teen mothers

Tag Archives: teen parents

self worth

 

Sometimes when we make mistakes or poor choices we can lose sight of our self worth. We can also let the opinions of others cause us to look down on our own selves and we forget that we too are still somebody. No matter where you are in life right now, please remember that you still have SELF WORTH! Things may seem a little blurry right now and you may feel down but you still have SELF WORTH!

 

Don’t allow people to put you down just because you  are a teen mom. The statics are not who you are. You can rise above it and prove just how much worth you still have. Our decisions are a part of us but they do not define the very essence of who we are. You are going to have to be very selective of the type people that you choose to hang around. Their influence in your life and that of your child will be crucial. They will either encourage you to achieve greater or they will continue to tell you what you can’t do. Be careful who you allow in your inner circle. It’s no longer just you but you have another human being depending on you as well. The choices you make will also lead them. Our children often imitate us on various levels if we play close attention to them.

 

 

yourworth

 

 

You must believe in yourself even if no one else will do it. You must encourage yourself even if no one else knows the importance of it. You cannot depend on people to validate your self worth. You must know that on your own first and then others will notice it. How you treat yourself is the standard for everyone else including your child. You are still a jewel in God’s eye sight! You still matter! You are still worth it!

 

you are worth it


parents helping with homework

 

 

 

Support your child’s learning at home

 

14. Demonstrate a positive attitude about education to your children. What we say and do in our daily lives can help them to develop positive attitudes toward school and learning and to build confidence in themselves as learners. Showing our children that we both value education and use it in our daily lives provides them with powerful models and contributes greatly to their success in school.

In addition, by showing interest in their children’s education, parents and families can spark enthusiasm in them and lead them to a very important understanding-that learning can be enjoyable as well as rewarding and is well worth the effort required.

 

15. Monitor your child’s television, video game, and Internet use. American children on average spend far more time watching TV, playing video games and using the Internet than they do completing homework or other school-related activities. How to Monitor TV Viewing and Video Game Playing and Help Your Child Learn to Use the Internet Properly and Effectively offer some ideas for helping your child use the media effectively.

 

16. Encourage your child to read. Helping your child become a reader is the single most important thing that you can do to help the child to succeed in school-and in life. The importance of reading simply can’t be overstated. Reading helps children in all school subjects. More important, it is the key to lifelong learning. Learn more in Fun Reading Tips and Activities and Fun and Effective Ways to Read with Children.

 

17. Talk with your child. Talking and listening play major roles in children’s school success. It’s through hearing parents and family members talk and through responding to that talk that young children begin to pick up the language skills they will need if they are to do well. For example, children who don’t hear a lot of talk and who aren’t encouraged to talk themselves often have problems learning to read, which can lead to other school problems. In addition, children who haven’t learned to listen carefully often have trouble following directions and paying attention in class. It’s also important for you to show your child that you’re interested in what he has to say. Talking With Your Child offers some great ideas for using conversation to stimulate language development.

 

18. Encourage your child to use the library. Libraries are places of learning and discovery for everyone. Helping your child find out about libraries will set him on the road to being an independent learner. Remember that libraries also offer a quiet place for students to complete homework, and are often open in the evening. Learn more about resources for students in Library Services for School-Aged Children.

 

19. Encourage your child to be responsible and work independently. Taking responsibility and working independently are important qualities for school success. You can help your child to develop these qualities by establish reasonable rules that you enforce consistently, making it clear to your child that he has to take responsibility for what he does, both at home and at school, showing your child how to break a job down into small steps, and monitor what your child does after school, in the evenings and on weekends. If you can’t be there when your child gets home, give her the responsibility of checking in with you by phone to discuss her plans. Learn more in Encourage Responsibility, Independence, and Active Learning.

 

20. Encourage active learning. Children need active learning as well as quiet learning such as reading and doing homework. Active learning involves asking and answering questions, solving problems and exploring interests. Active learning also can take place when your child plays sports, spends time with friends, acts in a school play, plays a musical instrument or visits museums and bookstores. To promote active learning, listen to your child’s ideas and respond to them. Let him jump in with questions and opinions when you read books together. When you encourage this type of give-and-take at home, your child’s participation and interest in school is likely to increase.

 

source: http://www.colorincolorado.org/families/school/helpyourkids/


back to school

 

 

 

The following health and safety tips are from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Making the First Day Easier

  • Remind your child that there are probably a lot of students who are uneasy about the first day of school. Teachers know that students are anxious and will make an extra effort to make sure everyone feels as comfortable as possible.
  • Point out the positive aspects of starting school: It will be fun! She’ll see old friends and meet new ones. Refresh her positive memories about previous years, when she may have returned home after the first day with high spirits because she had a good time.
  • Find another child in the neighborhood with whom your youngster can walk to school or ride on the bus.
  • If you feel it is appropriate, drive your child (or walk with her) to school and pick her up on the first day.

 

Backpack Safety

  • Choose a backpack with wide, padded shoulder straps and a padded back.
  • Pack light. Organize the backpack to use all of its compartments. Pack heavier items closest to the center of the back. The backpack should never weigh more than 10 to 20 percent of your child’s body weight.
  • Always use both shoulder straps. Slinging a backpack over one shoulder can strain muscles.
  • If your school allows, consider a rolling backpack. This type of backpack may be a good choice for students who must tote a heavy load. Remember that rolling backpacks still must be carried up stairs, and they may be difficult to roll in snow.

 

Source: http://www.healthychildren.org/English/news/pages/Back-to-School-Tips.aspx?nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3a+No+local+token


parents at school

 

 

 

 

Support your child academically

 

4. Find out how your child is doing. Ask the teacher how well your child is doing in class compared to other students. If your child is not keeping up, especially when it comes to reading, ask what you or the school can do to help. It’s important to act early before your child gets too far behind. Also be sure to review your child’s report card each time it comes out. For more information, see How To Know When Your Child Needs Extra Help.

 

5. Apply for special services if you think your child may need it. If your child is having problems with learning, ask the school to evaluate your child in his or her strongest language. The teacher might be able to provide accommodations for your child in class. If the school finds out your child has a learning disability, he can receive extra help at no cost. For more information, see Where To Go For Help.

 

6. Make sure that your child gets homework done. Let your child know that you think education is important and that homework needs to be done each day. You can help your child with homework by setting aside a special place to study, establishing a regular time for homework, and removing distractions such as the television and social phone calls during homework time. Helping Your Child With Homework offers some great ideas for ensuring that your child gets homework done.

If you are reluctant to help your child with homework because you feel that you don’t know the subject well enough or because you don’t speak or read English, you can help by showing that you are interested, helping your child get organized, providing the necessary materials, asking your child about daily assignments, monitoring work to make sure that it is completed, and praising all of your child’s efforts. Remember that doing your child’s homework for him won’t help him in the long run.

 

7. Find homework help for your child if needed. If it is difficult for you to help your child with homework or school projects, see if you can find someone else who can help. Contact the school, tutoring groups, after school programs, churches, and libraries. Or see if an older student, neighbor, or friend can help.

 

8. Help your child prepare for tests. Tests play an important role in determining a students grade. Your child may also take one or more standardized tests during the school year, and your child’s teacher may spend class time on test preparation throughout the year. As a parent, there are a number of ways that you can support your child before and after taking a standardized test, as well as a number of ways you can support your child’s learning habits on a daily basis that will help her be more prepared when it’s time to be tested. Learn more standardized tests and general test-taking in How to Help Your Child Prepare for Standardized Tests.

 

source: http://www.colorincolorado.org/families/school/helpyourkids/


successful in school

 

 

 

As a parent, you are your child’s first and most important teacher. When parents and families are involved in their children’s schools, the children do better and have better feelings about going to school. In fact, many studies show that what the family does is more important to a child’s school success than how much money the family makes or how much education the parents have. There are many ways that parents can support their children’s learning at home and throughout the school year. Here are some ideas to get you started!

 

Develop a partnership with your child’s teachers and school staff

 

1. Meet your child’s teacher. As soon as the school year starts, try to find a way to meet your child’s teacher. Let the teacher know you want to help your child learn. Make it clear that you want the teacher to contact you if any problems develop with your child. Talk with your child’s teacher offers some great tips for developing a partnership with your child’s teacher.

If you feel uncomfortable speaking English, don’t let a language barrier stop you. What you have to say is more important than the language you say it in! Ask the school to find someone who can interpret for you. There may be a teacher or parent liaison who can help. Or you can bring a bilingual friend or relative with you.

 

2. Get to know who’s who at your child’s school. There are many people at your child’s school who are there to help your child learn, grow socially and emotionally, and navigate the school environment. Who’s Who at Your Child’s School describes the responsibilities of teachers, administrators, and district staff. Each school is different but this article will offer a general introduction to personnel of your child’s school.

 

3. Attend parent-teacher conferences and keep in touch with your child’s teacher. Schools usually have one or two parent-teacher conferences each year. You can bring a friend to interpret for you or ask the school to provide an interpreter. You can also ask to meet with your child’s teacher any time during the year. If you have a concern and can’t meet face-to-face, send the teacher a short note or set up a time to talk on the phone. For more ideas about how to prepare for parent-teacher conferences, see Tips for Successful Parent-Teacher Conferences at Your Child’s School.

 

Source: http://www.colorincolorado.org/families/school/helpyourkids/


teen mom

 

 

Parenting can be a source of enormous pleasure over a lifetime. However, it’s also a time-consuming and demanding job. In addition to fulfilling their children’s basic physical needs, parents face the challenge of fostering the intellectual, emotional and social development of their progeny. Like every child, every parent is different. However, all good parents share some essential qualities that help their children develop into responsible adults.

 

Love

 
Making a child feel cherished is the single most important quality of an effective parent, according to Duncan. He recommends spending time with your child doing what she wants to do. For example, play your child’s favorite game or read together. Show affection through warm words, hugs and facial expressions. When you must correct a child, do it in love, recommend the experts at “KidsHealth,” part of the Nemours Foundation’s Center for Children’s Health Media team. When you correct a child in love, you are more likely to avoid criticism and blaming, instead calmly telling your child what you expect. It’s important to avoid using negative vocabulary like “bad,” because your child may internalize the label, thinking she’s unacceptable instead of just the behavior.
 
 
 
 
teen mom3
 
 

Effective Teacher

 

Effective parents all teach their children both directly and indirectly, but especially by example. Model the traits you want your child to learn, including good manners, respect and friendliness. Set clear rules and enforce them. For example, have a set time for homework. Good parents praise good behavior, but have predetermined consequences for mistakes or negative actions, such as no television if a child didn’t finish her homework. Encourage learning by taking your child to age-appropriate educational activities, such as the zoo or concerts, and by filling your home with books, whether purchased or borrowed from the library. Children who are exposed to books from an early age start school with a distinct advantage because their vocabularies tend to be much larger and they’ve had a greater exposure to speech and the written word.

 

 

Flexibility

Having clear standards doesn’t mean good parents are rigid. As your child grows from infant to toddler to teen, her needs change along with her body. “KidsHealth” reports that parents shouldn’t compare one child to another, and that rules should shift to match the age, needs and development of your children. You might expect a child of 2 to throw a short temper tantrum, but not a preteen, as Dr. Sears states. However, an effective parent takes cues from her child, whether an infant’s cry or a teenager’s moods, to know what will work best in a particular situation. Stay tuned to your child’s evolving needs by keeping involved in her life.

 

 

teen mom2

 

 

Self-Acceptance

A good parent is many things, but he is not perfect, according to Dr. Sears. He also reminds parents that it’s fine to be imperfect as long as you set a good example most of the time. In any case, even the most effective parent can’t control genetic traits or the outside environment. Trust your instincts as a parent, but don’t confuse effective parenting with perfection. Practice showing love and flexibility toward yourself, as well as toward your children.

 

By: Karen Farnen, Demand Media

http://everydaylife.globalpost.com/three-qualities-good-parent-4306.html 


attitude

 

 

When I saw this the other day, all I could do was laugh! This statement is so true but often overlooked. Have you been wondering lately, what is wrong with my child? Let me suggest that  you answer that question by asking yourself, “whats wrong with me?”

 

Believe it or not but our children pick up on our moods, attitudes and emotions. If you have been stressed lately,  your child(ren) is more likely to act out or go in a shell. Have you been crying a lot lately? Your child  may become more whiney. Are you always snapping at people? Your child may develop those same characteristics right before your very eyes.

 

We can no longer tell children to do as I say and not as I do. They are looking at you to be a  role model. You are the example. Have you thought about that? You are the example. They will learn how to treat people by watching you. They will learn how to deal with situations by watching you. They will learn how to deal with relationships by watching you. They will know how to talk to people by listening to you. You are their blueprint for life!

 

Instead of asking what is wrong with my child, turn that question around and ask yourself? I challenge you to be more aware of your actions and emotions. Then watch the changes in your child(ren). You will be amazed at how very much they are connected. When you feel yourself being overwhelmed or stressed, take a deep breath before you act or say anything because  your child(ren) are watching. What do you want them to see?

 

Remember you are their blueprint for life!  

 

Father, help me to be more aware of my actions and emotions for the sake of my child(ren). Help me to slow down enough to take a deep breath before I do anything. Help me to look to You for my answers. In Jesus’ name, amen!



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